The ongoing battle of the floor installation methods: which is best?
How to restore a Parquet floor - what to be aware of

Discovering a Oak parquet floor - how to restore?

One of the questions we received last week:

Dear Wood You Like

I have just discovered under carpet a floor of oak wood blocks (in a herringbone pattern and in a generally good condition). The location is the hallway (approximately 9 square meters).

80% of the blocks were loose so I have lifted them all and cleaned them as much as I can, however I haven't been able to remove the bitumen (which is generally only a thin layer) that held them to the concrete floor.

Once I have relaid them I would like to sand and satin a lighter more even colour.

My questions are:..... Read more

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Comments

Katharine Partington

Just had an oak floor fitted and there are some fairly large up to 5cm knot holes in it. What would you advise be for filling these holes?

Karin H.

Hi Katharine

The seize of the knot normally depends on the grade you bought and if appropriate to the grade are part of the character.
You could fill them with hard wax - if your floor has an oiled finish.

Wood You Like Ltd

Teresa Dawkins

I had 20mm oak wood flooring laid last summer 07 in the hallway and through lounge. The flooring cost me £1700 and and further £700 to have it fitted. We have recently discovered that the planks near the lounge door entrance is starting to raise creating a bouncing effect and restricting the door from opening/closing. The floors are also creaking now. The thing is I do not recall any membrane being laid between the timber sub floor and the new oak floor. I want to go back to the tradesman who fitted it but wish to check first how liable is he for not recommending and carrying out the laying of a membrane to prevent moisture from damaging my floors. I am told i may need to take the whole thing up. What should i do? Please help!!

Karin H.

Hi Teresa

On existing floorboards you should never use a moist membrane: this could cause condensation between the membrane and the existing floorboards: these and the joists could start to rot.

Did the area you live in receive a lot of rain lately and/or were air-bricks for needed ventilation covered up recently? Call back you fitter and have him check the expansion gaps near the troubled area. Cutting off a little bit of the boards near there might be enough to resolve this.

Hope this help

Wood You Like Ltd

pfheating@aol.com

help, is it possible to have electric ribbon underfloor heating underneath parquet floors?

Karin H.

Hi pfheating

Yes it is, as long you can install the ribbon underfloor heating underneath plywood (8 or 12mm exterior grade). The plywood then acts as subfloor onto which you can glue down (with flexible adhesive) your parquet blocks/tiles

Hope this helps
Wood You Like Ltd

At 08:30 31/08/2009, you wrote:

pfheating@aol.com

thanks for the reply, the blocks are already down and i'm a little dubious about taking them up and then relaying them.

Karin H.

Then I don't really understand your question about installing electrical UFH underneath a parquet floor.
What exactly do/did you have in mind?

Wood You Like Ltd


At 21:32 31/08/2009, you wrote:

Traylee

Hi, please could you help me, I have some reclaimed oak blocks which i wish to lay, am i better to sand them individually before i lay them as once laid the wood grain will be in many different directions (herringbone pattern) will this be problam?

Karin H.

Hi there

Sanding before you install them might get rid of any original finish, but you might end up with height differences meaning you still have to sand again.
Sanding a herringbone should not be a problem - it's never for us - when you follow the normal sanding steps, as described here

Kind Regards
Wood You Like Ltd
Karin Hermans

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