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Dull floor after wood worm treatment

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Hi, can you advise please?

I have a herringbone parquet wood floor in my entrance hall and hallway in my house that was built about 60 years ago. Recently I was redecorating the entrance hall and noticed some woodworm flight holes in areas of the entrance hall: some clearly old and some newer looking ones.
The specialist treatment I applied needed the surface coat to be stripped away, which I did on the area affected (about a dozen tiles covering about 1 sq m). I did this by stripping and sanding and then treating.

However, I am puzzled on how to get back to a matching finish now that I have completed the treatment. It is not a polyurethane varnish as a drop of water leaves a white mark. But danish oil does not give any shine and floor wax does not seem to bring up the shine and lustre. Previous to my treatment, the floor was occasionally polished by my wife with a wax polish. But this, on a trial area, on its own wont bring the surface condition back. Your site looks very informative and helpful. Any advice would be welcome. My local paint shop simply say buy some satin polyurethane varnish, but I am careful about this.

In essence, I don't really want to sand the whole floor down if I can help it.

Thanks, Ian

Old fashion does not always mean obsolete

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When a floor is sanded bare it will take a few coats of wax before it comes back to its shine and lustre. If the floor always has been polished with this wax it would indeed be best to treat the sanded part with this wax too but it might take a bit longer to give you the result you are looking/hoping for.

Also bare in mind that when an existing floor is sanded it will lose its matured patina and will show slight colour differences between non-sanded and sanded parts of the floor. This will gradually "fade" to the same appearance.

Treat the sanded part with wax, buff it in and give the floor time to absorb it. Then treat it again one or two days later in the same way. Repeat this a few times, but make sure the floor has time to absorb it before you apply the next coat of wax otherwise you'll end with a sticky mess.

Hope this makes sense?

Let us know how you get on. Remember, it's taken your floor a long time to get its authentic shine and lustre and these things do take time (us modern humans would prefer everything to be done/finished/right yesterday, but nature takes it time to give you the best )

Karin - Wood You LIke Ltd

Answered received:

Very many thanks for this advice. I was getting a bit despairing at getting back the look without considerable effort and expense.

I will have a go at your suggestions this weekend.

Best regards

Ian

And the result:

You asked for feedback on how I got on.

Well I started on Friday evening and followed your suggestion: particularly to leave it to absorb. The effect has been great. The luster is returning – although there are still patina differences between the areas.

I have repeated the treatment and as you say it does blend in better each time.

Many thanks indeed.

Ian

At your service, always more than happy to help out, even if it means re-instating old-fashion methods which now in these (ultra) modern times still prove their worth.

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